Private Funding

Estimated costs and what you are
entitled to in terms of assessment help

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Private Funding

Paying for your own care is also referred to as self funding.  Whether you will be required to pay for your own care depends on certain criteria and an assessment of your needs.

Getting a Financial Assessment

If you have savings worth more than £23,250 you will not be entitled to funding from your Local Authority or council.  If you are moving into a care home and own your own property you might also have to fund your care yourself.

It is, however, worth checking your situation with your Local Authority as you are entitled to ask for a financial assessment to check what rules apply to you and whether you qualify.

 

Read more from the NHS

 

Getting a Needs Assessment

If you do not qualify for any type of funding and are paying for care yourself, it is still important to understand what your needs are so that you know how much care you need, from whom and when.  A needs assessment is free and available to anyone, regardless of how their care is being paid for.  The NHS provides a good guide on how to get a needs assessment and the link you need to apply.

 

Read more from the NHS

Care costs will depend on your needs, but for care at home they are broadly charged on a per hour basis, with hourly rates increasing in line with the complexity of care offered. The NHS estimates that a live-in carer will cost anything between £650 a week up to £1,600 depending on the care required.

This figure can rise for more complex needs, however at this stage, funding from Clinical Commissioning Groups or Local Authorities might well kick in so it is always worth checking what you are entitled to, based on an assessment of your needs.

When weighing up care at home versus a care home, Age UK estimates costs for a care home from £600 per week for a residential (non-nursing) home to £840 per week for a nursing home.  The choice of home will depend on your care requirements.

 

Read more from Age UK

If you are paying for the care yourself, you can pay the care provider directly from your own funds.  If you are not comfortable managing this yourself, some councils will arrange and pay for your care on your behalf, and then bill you for this service.  Not all councils offer this service and they may charge a fee for doing this for you.

  • Getting Assessed

    Getting a Financial Assessment

    If you have savings worth more than £23,250 you will not be entitled to funding from your Local Authority or council.  If you are moving into a care home and own your own property you might also have to fund your care yourself.

    It is, however, worth checking your situation with your Local Authority as you are entitled to ask for a financial assessment to check what rules apply to you and whether you qualify.

     

    Read more from the NHS

     

    Getting a Needs Assessment

    If you do not qualify for any type of funding and are paying for care yourself, it is still important to understand what your needs are so that you know how much care you need, from whom and when.  A needs assessment is free and available to anyone, regardless of how their care is being paid for.  The NHS provides a good guide on how to get a needs assessment and the link you need to apply.

     

    Read more from the NHS

  • How Much Will It Cost?

    Care costs will depend on your needs, but for care at home they are broadly charged on a per hour basis, with hourly rates increasing in line with the complexity of care offered. The NHS estimates that a live-in carer will cost anything between £650 a week up to £1,600 depending on the care required.

    This figure can rise for more complex needs, however at this stage, funding from Clinical Commissioning Groups or Local Authorities might well kick in so it is always worth checking what you are entitled to, based on an assessment of your needs.

    When weighing up care at home versus a care home, Age UK estimates costs for a care home from £600 per week for a residential (non-nursing) home to £840 per week for a nursing home.  The choice of home will depend on your care requirements.

     

    Read more from Age UK

  • Paying For Your Care

    If you are paying for the care yourself, you can pay the care provider directly from your own funds.  If you are not comfortable managing this yourself, some councils will arrange and pay for your care on your behalf, and then bill you for this service.  Not all councils offer this service and they may charge a fee for doing this for you.